Monday, July 30, 2018

Review: Hunting Charles Manson by Lis Wiehl

Hunting Charles Manson
by Lis Wiehl

Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Pages: 336
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  In the late summer of 1969, the nation was transfixed by a series of gruesome murders in the hills of Los Angeles. Newspapers and television programs detailed the brutal slayings of a beautiful actress--twenty six years old and eight months pregnant with her first child--as well as a hair stylist, an heiress, a businessman, and other victims. The City of Angels was plunged into a nightmare of fear and dread. In the weeks and months that followed, law enforcement faced intense pressure to solve crimes that seemed to have no connection.

Finally, after months of dead-ends, false leads, and near-misses, Charles Manson and members of his "family" were arrested. The bewildering trials that followed once again captured the nation and forever secured Manson as a byword for the evil that men do.

Drawing upon deep archival research and exclusive personal interviews--including unique access to Manson Family parole hearings--former federal prosecutor and Fox News legal analyst Lis Wiehl has written a propulsive, page-turning historical thriller of the crimes and manhunt that mesmerized the nation. And in the process, she reveals how the social and political context that gave rise to Manson is eerily similar to our own.


Kritters Thoughts:  I have read a few books about Charles Manson both fiction and non fiction but this one sticks out as the most readable and enjoyable.  Although it is hard to keep everyone straight because of their real names and Family names and the ones that come in and out of the Family, but this one felt the most full and encompassing of both life during their rise the murders and the post.  

I liked that this book showed a full picture of both Charles Manson and all of the people he took in.  There was just as much background and information on Charles Manson as there was about the members of his "Family."  There were so many things in this book that I wasn't aware of and the way it was presented it was easy to read and learn so much.

I think I liked most the post murder/trial part of the book.  I never knew how nutty Charles acted during his trial and then during his many parole hearings.  It was so interesting to hear how they tried to create mistrials and how the judges avoided them.  I liked that there was a large number of chapters that focused on this time of his life because I think that was the part I knew the littlest about.  

I have read Lis Wiehl's fiction and loved them, so I was pretty sure going into this one that I would enjoy her writing, but I liked it even more than I predicted.


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from Smith Publicity.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Sunday, July 29, 2018

It's Monday, What are you Reading?

With all the rain this week, there was nothing to do, but curl up and read!


A
 meme hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. 

Finished this past week:
The Christmas Angel Project by Melody Carlson
The Sugarhouse Blues by Mariah Stewart
Can't Help Myself by Meredith Goldstein
Jacob's Descent by Sandra Brannan
Jeremiah's Revenge by Sandra Brannan
Hunting Charles Manson by Lis Wiehl
Jane Doe by Victoria Helen Stone

Currently Reading:
If We Had Known by Elise Juska

Next on the TBR pile:
Our House by Louise Candlish

Friday, July 27, 2018

Review: The Love Letter by Rachel Hauck

The Love Letter
Rachel Hauck

Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Pages: 352
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  With the colonies at war and his country divided, Hamilton Lightfoot must choose sides: Fight for the British Crown or for the Independence of America. But after witnessing the death of his family at the hands of redcoats, he fears he’ll fight for revenge instead of honor. On the verge of a great battle, he pens a letter to Esther, the woman he loves.

Esther Longfellow is in love with Hamilton, but her father is a loyalist, living in upcountry South Carolina and working for a wealthy British lord. When the Revolutionary War comes to her doorstep she is forced to choose between devotion to her father and her love for Hamilton.

Chloe Daschle is the daughter of Hollywood royalty—a great director and an Oscar-winning actress. Yet her career has taken an unexpected turn: She’s the queen of death scenes. Trying to break out, she accepts a supporting role in a revolutionary war film. But she longs for the perfect role and the perfect real-life romance. Does happily ever after only exist in the movies?

After a life-changing tragedy, MIT graduate Jesse Gates decides to leave his life behind and move to LA to try his hand at acting and screenwriting. When he finds a page from one of his ancestor’s letters, he becomes consumed with the love he finds there. Determined to help his grandfather find happiness at the end of his life, Jesse writes and sells a screenplay based on the events surrounding the lost love of previous generations.

When Jesse meets the woman he has cast to play Esther Longfellow—his grandfather’s one true love—the stories of all four collide across time and space. The love letter from the past might have more power to affect the future than any of them could have imagined.


Kritters Thoughts:  I sit on the fence often when I read Rachel Hauck.  Her books have such great plot and story and characters but I am aware they are in the Christian fiction genre they just seem to be a little heavy handed in that area.  I am not naive in that I know going into a Christian fiction book that there will be elements of the faith in the book, but I like them to be a little more subtle if I were wanting to give this book to someone and slowly introducing them to the faith, this would not be the book I would recommend.  

At the same time, I love the story and the plot.  I love the dual storylines that clearly are connected from page one.  But got even more connected as the story progresses.  I loved Chloe and Jesse.  Their story was interesting and kept me hooked on the book.  I loved the inside peek into Hollywood and how they were both connected to the industry in different ways.  It was also interesting to see inside a filming set and schedule - I know its fiction, but it felt based in reality just a bit!  

I enjoy Rachel Hauck, but I am hesitant to recommend her to any reader.  There is a big asterisk I give when talking about her to other readers.  She is definitely in the Christian fiction lane, but if you enjoy a good plot and characters with some Christianity, then you could enjoy her books too.  


Rating: enjoyable, but didn't leave me wanting more

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from TLC Book Tours.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Review: What Remains of Her by Eric Rickstad

What Remains of Her
by Eric Rickstad

Publisher: William Morrow
Pages: 416
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  I won’t say a word. Cross my heart and hope to die…

Jonah Baum, a professor of poetry at a local college in Vermont, sees his ordinary life come tumbling down when his wife and young daughter vanish from their home. No evidence of a kidnapping. No sign of murder. No proof that Rebecca didn’t simply abandon her marriage. Just Sally’s crude and chilling drawings, Jonah’s little lies, and the sheriff’s nagging fears that nothing is what it seems.

For Sally’s best friend, Lucinda, it’s something else. She trusts in Sally not to just disappear, not after they’ve shared so many secrets—especially about the woods and what they saw there. But she’ll never tell. No one would believe her anyway.

As the search for Rebecca and Sally intensifies, and as suspicion falls on Jonah, the disappearances become more relentlessly haunting than anyone can imagine. Because what’s seen in the light of day is not nearly as terrifying as what remains hidden in the dark…


Kritters Thoughts:  Sometimes you just need a good mystery/thriller to curl up with on a rainy weekend and this book was just that.  A poetry professor who has been wishing for tenure in a small town in Vermont comes home to find his wife and daughter missing and he has no clue as to where they have gone.  25 years later another little girl goes missing and it just seems way to close to the same thing happening again.  

With short chapters this book moved so quickly.  I find books with short chapters, I keep saying oh one more chapter and all of the sudden I am half way or flipping the last page!  I like this set up for mysteries because it keeps the pacing going and going.  

I loved these characters.  Some were easy to trust and hope that they were innocent of all things and then other that made you wonder and uneasy - I loved it.  The culprit in the end came out of left field, but I wasn't disappointed by it.  I think the biggest thing about a mystery is the who dun it in the end and if it is a person from way too far out of left field it can feel unsatisfying.  Instead this book made me go hmm out loud and want to reread to see if I can find a clue that would point to them and that for me makes a mystery so good!

This was my first Eric Rickstad read and I am excited to try another and see if they live up to this one.  Have you read him before?  What should I read next?


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from HarperCollins.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.



Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Review: Woman Walks into a Bar by Rowan Coleman

Woman Walks into a Bar
by Rowan Coleman

Publisher: Pocket Star
Pages: 128
Format: eARC
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  Twenty-eight-year-old single mother Sam spends her days working in the local supermarket and her Friday nights out with her friends, letting her hair down at the White Horse. Life has never been easy for Sam, but she’s always hoped that one day she’ll meet The One. 

After a series of terrible dates with men she’s met through an Internet dating agency, she’s starting to lose heart—until her friends tell her they’ve set her up on a blind date. Sam is horrified but finally she agrees to go—after all, you never know when you might meet the man of your dreams…

Kritters Thoughts:  What a short and sweet little book.  A single mom has been single for a long time and there are a few reasons as to why she hasn't gotten back into the dating field.  One of those reasons is her daughter, but it is also her daughter that is encouraging her to keep trying to find a new love.  

This little book dives quickly into her attempts at online dating, being set up by friends and so on.  While at the same time it also goes back into the past to the men that ruined love for her and make her very hesitant to enter into a new relationship.  

I really loved this book.  It was a quick read, perfect afternoon read to escape from the usual chores and to do list.  It was also perfect for that time in your life where you can't commit to a full novel and would love to start and finish something all in one sitting.  I would love to find more books in this same vein.  


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row


Ebook 2018 Challenge: 61 out of 100


Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from Netgalley.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Monday, July 23, 2018

Review: The Last Thing I Told You by Emily Arsenault

The Last Thing I Told You
by Emily Arsenault

Publisher: William Morrow
Pages: 416
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  I hear myself whispering. Not again. Not again.

Why did I ever come back here? Surely because of you. Because I thought of something I’d always meant to tell you. Because you were the only one I ever really wanted to tell it to…

Therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead—bludgeoned in his office.

But that doesn’t stop former patient Nadine Raines from talking to him—in her head. Why did she come back to her hometown after so many years away? Everyone here thinks she’s crazy. And she has to admit—they might have good reason to think so. She committed a shockingly violent act when she was sixteen, and has never really been able to explain that dark impulse—even to Fabian. Now that Fabian’s dead, why is she still trying?

Meanwhile, as Detective Henry Peacher investigates Fabian’s death, he discovers that shortly before he died, Fabian pulled the files of two former patients. One was of Nadine Raines, one of Henry’s former high school classmates. Henry still remembers the disturbing attack on a teacher that marked Nadine as a deeply troubled teen.

More shockingly, the other file was of Johnny Streeter, who is now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting five years ago. The shooting devastated the town and everyone—including Henry, who is uncomfortable with the “hero” status the tragedy afforded him—is ready to move on. But the appearance of his file brings up new questions. Maybe there is a decades-old connection between Nadine and Streeter. And maybe that somehow explains what Nadine is doing in Fabian’s office nearly twenty years after being his patient. Or how Fabian ended up dead two days after her return. Or why Nadine has fled town once again.

But as Nadine and Henry head toward a confrontation, both will discover that the secrets of people’s hearts are rarely simple, and—even in the hidden depths of a psychologist’s files—rarely as they appear.


Kritters Thoughts:  Told through multiple perspectives and weaving time and place, this mystery/thriller was interesting but missed the mark for me a bit.  

The main reason that this one didn't work for me was the book came to a climax and then fell very flat.  I was on Nadine's ride and ready for her story to really explode and it just kind of fizzled.  I wanted more for her and was very dissatisfied in her storyline.  

At the same time, I enjoyed the storyline that had Nadine and Johnny together in the past.  It was interesting to see them weave in and out of each other and wonder how they impacted each other.  

I also really liked Detective Henry Peacher.  I liked that he had obvious flaws and issues and wasn't anywhere near perfection.  There were times where he made me think of my husband as a detective and how each person has their past influence their jobs in positive and negative ways.

I read reviews after finishing the book and agreed with other reviewers when they said that there were some happenings in this book that could have been omitted and felt as though they junked up the story.  There were moments after reading where I reflected on the book and the parts and thought some could have been trimmed to make the story move a little faster and where all the pieces are completely connected.  


Rating: enjoyable, but didn't leave me wanting more

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from HarperCollins.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Sunday, July 22, 2018

It's Monday, What are you Reading?

What a big week in reading!  

A
 meme hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. 

Finished this past week:
Woman Walks into a Bar by Rowan Coleman
Beautiful Exiles by Meg Waite Clayton
Moan by Emma Koenig
The House at Saltwater Point by Colleen Coble
Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win by Jo Piazza
What Remains of Her by Eric Rickstad

Currently Reading:
Can't Help Myself by Meredith Goldstein
The Sugarhouse Blues by Mariah Stewart

Next on the TBR pile:
If We Had Known by Elise Juska

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Review: Stalking Sapphire by Mia Thompson

Stalking Sapphire
by Mia Thompson

Publisher: Diversion Books
Pages: 184
Format: eARC
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  Despite the illusion Sapphire Dubois presents to the rest of the world, she is not just your stereotypical 22-year old Beverly Hills heiress; she hunts serial killers. While her fellow heirs spend their nights with trending celebs and drugs at the hottest club, Sapphire secretly spends hers luring, capturing, and anonymously handing over So-Cal’s most wanted killers to the police — just your average Tuesday night. 

What Sapphire doesn’t know is that one of her adversaries is watching her every move, aware of both her true identity and her unconventional hobby. Needless to say, he doesn’t approve. Used to being the one who redefines the definition of predator and prey, Sapphire’s world abruptly shatters when a gruesome ‘gift’ arrives for her at the Beverly Hills Country Club. With her involuntary crush, handsome Detective Aston Ridder, close on her tail, Sapphire now has to rethink her routine strategy and figure out how to capture a killer who already knows she’s coming.



Kritters Thoughts:  Sapphire Dubois lives in a fancy house in Beverly Hills and she has an inheritance that is more than most people will make in a lifetime, but she doesn't care about any of this, she cares more about the serial killer that she just led to the police!  And she is just 22 years old!  

I loved this book mostly because I loved Sapphire as a character.  The mystery that she was solving was just ok, but Sapphire herself was so great!  I loved how she was balancing almost two lives and what happened when they collided a bit.  

As far as the mystery in the book it was just ok, but I say this as a reader who reads a ton in this genre every year.  I was satisfied as to who was the perp in the end and I did enjoy that I was wrong when I thought I had guessed way too early.  BUT I didn't love this in the same breath.  The clues that obviously pointed to one person didn't completely work for me when the actual person was revealed.  I didn't think the clues and hints pointed towards him and I felt if I reread the book I still wouldn't have picked him out.  This may all be confusing, but trying to tell my reasons without spoiling the book!

The thing that impressed me most was my biggest concern going in.  I was nervous to read a mystery/thriller book that was only 184 pages and was worried that it would feel rushed and not fleshed out with the limited pages.  This was not the case at all.  I felt like the story was full and had the twists and turns that would have been there if it had been over 300 pages.  

I don't know yet if I will continue with the series, but I am glad I tried this one.


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row


Ebook 2018 Challenge: 60 out of 100


Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from Netgalley.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Review: When We Found Home by Susan Mallery

When We Found Home
by Susan Mallery

Publisher: HQN Books
Pages: 416
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  Life is meant to be savored, but that's not easy with no family, limited prospects and a past you'd rather not talk about. Still, Callie Smith doesn't know how to feel when she discovers she has a brother and a sister--Malcolm, who grew up with affection, wealth and privilege, and Keira, a streetwise twelve-year-old. 

Callie doesn't love being alone, but at least it's safe. Despite her trepidation, she moves into the grand family home with her siblings and grandfather on the shores of Lake Washington, hoping just maybe this will be the start of a whole new life.

But starting over can be messy. Callie and Keira fit in with each other, but not with their posh new lifestyle, leaving Malcolm feeling like the odd man out in his own home. He was clever enough to turn a sleepy Seattle mail-order food catalog into an online gourmet powerhouse, yet he can't figure out how to help his new sisters feel secure. Becoming a family will take patience, humor, a little bit of wine and a whole lot of love. 

But love isn't Malcolm's strong suit... until a beautiful barista teaches him that an open heart, like the family table, can always make room for more.


Kritters Thoughts:  Three half siblings that didn't know they each existed until recently and due to the love and pursuit of a grandfather they are brought into a home and each get a life reset.  

One of my complaints is about Callie and Santiago.  He meets her in the warehouse and doesn't know who she is and finds out from Malcolm, but has yet to have a conversation with her and then decides she is the love of his life and he will pursue her, REALLY?  He went from 0 to 80 in 10 seconds and without even talking to her, didn't love it.  So he admits it out loud, but I just couldn't get behind it, it was just so weird.  And it continued throughout the book, I never really got behind that pairing.

On the other hand I liked Malcom and Keira's story so much better.  It felt like it had history and back story and I just loved the ups and downs they had in the book, they felt so real and true and honest.  

I like to warn when a book has sexy times and this one had a few scenes.  It didn't seem too overwhelming, but they were definitely in there so if you like to avoid those books, I would warn you with this one.

I love Susan Mallery single books, they have some romance but they have super strong plots and great characters.  I will continue to read her one off books they are perfect reads for pool days.


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from TLC Book Tours.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

It's Monday, What are you Reading?

With fourth of july and our niece for the weekend, not a lot of reading happened last week and weekend, but this week and weekend made up for it, so this is two weeks worth of reading.

A
 meme hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. 

Finished this past week:
Safe Houses by Dan Fesperman
The Summer Sail by Wendy Francis
Stalking Sapphire by Mia Thompson
When We Found Home by Susan Mallery
The Last Thing I Told You by Emily Arsenault
The Love Letter by Rachel Hauck

Currently Reading:
Woman Walks into a Bar by Rowan Coleman

Next on the TBR pile:
Beautiful Exiles by Meg Waite Clayton

Friday, July 13, 2018

Review: Safe Houses by Dan Fesperman

Safe Houses
by Dan Fesperman

Publisher: Knopf
Pages: 416
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  West Berlin, 1979. Helen Abell oversees the CIA's network of safe houses, rare havens for field agents and case officers amidst the dangerous milieu of a city in the grips of the Cold War. Helen's world is upended when, during her routine inspection of an agency property, she overhears a meeting between two people unfamiliar to her speaking a coded language that hints at shadowy realities far beyond her comprehension. Before the day is out, she witnesses a second unauthorized encounter, one that will place her in the sightlines of the most ruthless and powerful man at the agency. Her attempts to expose the dark truths about what she has witnessed will bring about repercussions that reach across decades and continents into the present day, when, in a farm town in Maryland, a young man is arrested for the double murder of his parents, and his sister takes it upon herself to find out why he did it.


Kritters Thoughts:  What an interesting book.  This is a combination historical fiction, mystery/thriller and this was one of those books that you had to read closely for many reasons.  For one there is a large cast of characters and some of them have two names as they are spys, field agents or have identities for one reason another.  You also have to read closely to make sure you know who works for whom and what side they are on.  

One thing that made me realize that I was really into this book and loving it, was my wonderment if any of this was based in truth.  I love when I go into a book with little back story and wonder the whole time if there is any truth behind the book - such a good feeling!  I wondered if the Sisterhood and almost hoped that there was some truth for these women in this moment in time had each other as a support system in this crazy male centric job field.  

After reading this, I decided that I really want to see this as a movie.  I don't think that often and don't care for my books to have a life outside of the book form, but this one really struck me as a great book to adapt and for it to hold up to the transfer from one art form to another.  

This was my first introduction to Dan Fesperman.  I was so excited to see quite the backlist when I finished this book.  I don't even know where to go next!  Where should I go if I liked this one a lot?


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row

Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from Knopf Publicity.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Review: The Summer Sail by Wendy Francis

The Summer Sail
by Wendy Francis

Publisher: Touchstone
Pages: 307
Format: book
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  Three college roommates are celebrating a twentieth wedding anniversary by taking a cruise to Bermuda. As the ship pulls away from the pier, everyone is looking forward to lounging by the pool, sipping sunset cocktails, and reminiscing. Abby, the mother hen of the group, will be celebrating her wedding anniversary in style, even as she and her husband keep a secret from the group. Ambitious career woman Caroline happily anticipates several stress-free days away from her magazine job with her boyfriend, Javier, who may or may not be finally inspired to propose. And single mom Lee (annoyingly gorgeous and irresistibly popular in college) hopes she’ll win back the affections of her formerly sweet daughter Lacey, who after her first year in college, has inexplicably become a little bit of a monster.

As the balmy pink shores of Bermuda come into view, tensions simmer, and old jealousies flare, sending the temperature from soothing to scorching in this engrossing tale of three best friends on a vacation they won’t soon forget—but not for the reasons they expect.


Kritters Thoughts:  When you think of a summer women's fiction novel, this is the book that should now come to mind.  Three women have been friends since college and they often take vacations to reconnect.  This year one of them decides to combine the vacation with a celebration of their wedding anniversary and the girls plus their families.  So off they go from Boston to Bermuda . . . 

I loved that the story equally focused on each of the three ladies.  Each had something going on, but nothing felt overtly dramatic.  It was no where near soap opera level drama as I explained to my mom, it was "normal people drama."  They each had a full story but nothing overshadowed one or the other.  

I loved the setting.  A summertime cruise to Bermuda was so fun.  I have only cruised once, but reading this book made me giggle a few times at the honest moments that everyone has on a cruise - the joy of finding a quiet nook on the ship or the realization that there is food available at all times of the day and how to not continuously eat!

This book was just the right thing to read over a summer weekend by the pool or on our boat!  I loved that it had a great plot, some good character feelings and just the right setting.  This elevated Wendy Francis to an author I want to watch out for!


Rating: absolutely loved it and want a sequel

Ebook 2018 Challenge:  59 out of 100


Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from Touchstone Publicity.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Review: The Subway Girls by Susie Orman Schnall

The Subway Girls
by Susie Orman Schnall

Publisher: St Martin's
Pages: 320
Format: eARC
Buy the Book: Amazon

Goodreads:  In 1949, dutiful and ambitious Charlotte's dream of a career in advertising is shattered when her father demands she help out with the family business. Meanwhile, Charlotte is swept into the glamorous world of the Miss Subways beauty contest, which promises irresistible opportunities with its Park Avenue luster and local fame status. But when her new friend—the intriguing and gorgeous fellow-participant Rose—does something unforgivable, Charlotte must make a heart-wrenching decision that will change the lives of those around her forever.

Nearly 70 years later, outspoken advertising executive Olivia is pitching the NYC subways account in a last ditch effort to save her job at an advertising agency. When the charismatic boss she’s secretly in love with pits her against her misogynistic nemesis, Olivia’s urgent search for the winning strategy leads her to the historic Miss Subways campaign. As the pitch date closes in on her, Olivia finds herself dealing with a broken heart, an unlikely new love interest, and an unexpected personal connection to Miss Subways that could save her job—and her future.


Kritters Thoughts:  One of those books that has two storylines, one in the present and one in the past.  I have to admit these are my favorite types of books, I get the historical fiction aspect, but also get to see something current and now.  Also, usually there is a little mystery as to how these two stories are connected, it is all of the genres I love rolled into one!

To focus on this book.  In 1949 there is Charlotte and she has huge dreams for a woman of this time to work in advertising and be an independent career woman before she settles down and does the wife and kid thing.  The current storyline revolves around Olivia and she works in advertising and is still feeling the effects of working in a "man's world."  

There was less of a mystery about how the stories were connected, it was just more obvious than most, but I didn't mind that at all.  Instead it was interesting to see the similarities between women in the workforce then and now and a few differences, wish that wasn't the case!

I loved this book even more when I found out that the Subway girls was based on fact and that this was a real campaign.  I love when an author chooses something that could be obscure and unknown from history and can create a whole world and story from this one little bit.  It makes me look things up and see the truth and I feel more engaged when there is fact behind the fiction.

I have read all of Susie Orman Schnall's books and I will continue she writes fantastic female stories with substance and depth.  After three books with two four star ratings and one three, I can give myself the fan status!


Rating: definitely a good read, but can't read two in a row


Ebook 2018 Challenge: 57 out of 100


Disclosure of Material Connection:  I received one copy of this book free of charge from St Martin's Press.  I was not required to write a positive review in exchange for receipt of the book; rather, the opinions expressed in this review are my own.

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